Selling out

I’ve been attending a local craft fair which is held fortnightly in Tarbert, Harris to sell my tweed. The success I’ve had has been beyond what I could ever have imagined and I’ve now completely sold out of three of my tweeds – the hopsack, green twill and my tartan. 

As great as that is, I’m really going to have to get cracking on with weaving some more. As soon as the warping mill is up and running in its new home, I’ll be paying a visit to the mill to buy more yarn!

2 thoughts on “Selling out

  1. PENNY KENYANJUI

    I am so surprised to find there are still independent weavers of Harris Tweed. Two things inspired me to learn to weave: seeing and elderly cousin weaving when I was about 2 or 3 and thinking I want to do that, and finding an ad for a sample of Harris Tweed when I was a young wife, in about 1964-5. I finally learned to weave in 1969, and spin in 1985 when I was about to be a grandmother. At this time I work for a woman who sells natural dyes and silks [aurorasilk.com]. I live in Portland, Oregon and collect lichen for dyeing on a regular basis and love that smell on wool. I don’t suppose Harris is still dyed with natural dyes because of volume of demand vs availability of dyes, etc. What kind of dyes do you use, just for my own curiosity.

    Good fortune on your wrist healing and regaining ability to weave. Sincerely, and with admiration, Penny K

    1. admin Post author

      Hi there,
      Thank you for your comments. The mills use synthetic dyes for the fleeces. My understanding is that our natural dyes are not viable for a commercial operation. My tweeds are approx 29″ wide. I have done undyed tweeds in the past in collaboration with Uist Wool but it’s not a regular thing unfortunately.

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